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Belgrade at night: the nineties are totally in

The music that made every dance floor crowded has a lot of audience even today

Friday 12th of January 2018

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The end of the twentieth century launched a musical genre overnight. Each bar played only dance hits. It was inconceivable to go out anywhere without dancing to the well-known rhythm. In Serbia, music was a source of positive energy and entertainment in a completely different way. Everyone remembered well a special styling that followed this course: a gold necklace, a tracksuit and the famous Nike Air Max sneakers. The girls were wearing short bright t-shirts (the forerunner of the modern crop top model), narrow jeans and platform sneakers.


Leaders who have "infected" the whole world are 2 Unlimited band. Dutch Ray Slijngaard and Anita Doth recorded the well-known "No Limit" song in 1993 and won almost all top charts. The single edition was sold in more than 2.3 million copies, breaking the record when it comes to dance music. Serbian singer Ivan Gavrilovic became famous with the song "200 na sat" (200 an Hour), which is actually cover of the popular hit. In 1994, everyone drove in Ivan's rhythm.


Absolute favourites of this period from the world scene are the songs "Coco Jamboo" from 1996 sang by Mr. President, then "It's My Life" released in 1992 by a dentist Dr. Alban, the famous song "What Is Love" by Haddaway and many others. However, the first who mixed the dance and rap, with a special way of dressing up is MC Hammer. His legendary hit "U Can't Touch This" was released in 1990. Shulwar (loose pants) and leather vest have become the most modern wardrobe of that time. The song is still very popular today. Dance duo bands were swarming onto the domestic scene. The most frequent formation was a boy who was rapping and a girl who was singing. Dr. Iggy also presented himself in the same manner. When he released the ballad "Oci boje duge" (Eyes of the colours of the rainbow), he could not even dream of his success. In a short time, he gained the status of the king of music of the nineties. Slow songs were great for "flirting" on the dance floor and this song broke all records when it came to popularity. The evergreen of this era will surely enter the history of domestic discography.


Different from the usual concept were bands like "Djogani Fantastiko". The leader Djole Djogani is primarily a dancer who brought "moonwalk" choreography to Serbia. The famous hit "Idemo na Mars" (Let's go to Mars) was released in the summer of 1994, and the entire nation was completely thrilled with dancing skills and world-class performances.


The unexcelled music epoch rules Belgrade clubbing supremely. Today, people do not wear tracksuits as they used to, except when parties are organized on this subject with a mandatory dress code. The musical genre that entered the Serbian scene more than two decades ago has a faithful audience even today. The Mr Stefan Braun club organizes a "Dizel party" every Tuesday and plays only hits from the nineties. Freestyler Winter Stage also booked Tuesday for entertainment called "We are the 90's" with the identical music programme. Every Wednesday at the Hype club, DJs have their "Mixer" evening when they play the music of the '80s and' 90s. A great combination for dancing to a cheerful rhythm.